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UN Ban Anime – Why UN Want To Ban Anime

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The Japanese response to the UN’s proposed ban on depictions of sexual violence in the media is thoughtful and reasonable

Un ban anime : Kumiko Yamada of the Japanese Women’s Institute Of Contemporary Media Culture has spoken up to defend the use of sexual violence in media with a refreshingly clear and sensible set of arguments, in one of those rare occasions when you renew your faith in humanity.

The United Nations has been making preparations in recent weeks to recommend the banning of Japanese media that depicts sexual violence against women, specifically manga, anime, and videogames.

Their claim is that these media are violating human rights because they frequently focus on women’s abuse.

However, there are some obvious issues with this type of cultural policing, and Yamada appears to have stepped in forcefully to explain why this approach to Japanese media is completely misguided.

We have a fairly complete translation of Yamada’s remark thanks to RyanoftheStars on Reddit.

The first point she makes about banning these types of media is that “the so-called sexual violence in manga and video games is a made-up thing and as such does not threaten the rights of actual people; therefore, it is meaningless in protecting the rights of women.”

The second point she makes is that “the so-called sexual violence in manga and video games is a made-up thing and as such does not threaten the rights of actual people;

therefore, it is meaningless in protecting the rights of women.”

“In Japan, and especially when it comes to manga, these are creative sectors that women themselves fostered and worked hard to create professions for themselves,” says the second point.

“Banning the sale of manga that contains sexual violence” would have the opposite effect, creating a new avenue of misogyny toward women.

Yamada, who appears to be a graphic designer, is definitely approaching this from both a professional and an artistic perspective.

In addition, the institute is a vocal independent research and study organisation comprised of volunteers.

This is one of the first times in the debate that Japanese women with a cultural stake in the issue have spoken up.

It will be interesting to watch if or not their Western colleagues pay attention.

Without a sure, this group’s independence has been questioned, but does the truth have to come from a source of authority before it is valid?

Yamada’s message is also worth reading in its full, as she makes a compelling case for media freedom of expression.

Her perspective is particularly relevant because she is a woman, and the UN’s plans represent a mistaken attempt to preserve her rights.

“There is nothing to be gained from regulating fictitious sexual violence,” she concludes calmly.

However, while you’re trying to address the rights of fictitious characters, you’re letting actual women’s human rights deteriorate.

In addition, the entire reason we have a media form like manga, which emerged to take on issues like sexual exploitation of women, stems from a willingness to tolerate “drinking the clean and the dirty without discrimination” in Japan.

It’s because we had the freedom to express our opinions, and with that, the opinion of a world of humans who live and die, in which there are pure and magnificent things mixed in with ugly and horrible things.”

“Manga is a field where women have worked hard to pave their own paths and carve out a niche for themselves.

We feel that in order to keep this site from being trampled on, we must continue to work hard to pass it on to future generations, and that this effort will be linked to increased women’s freedom and rights.”

Dr. Darren J. Ashmore was a great help with this article.

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